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Third Annual Poetry Poster is Here

As before, I have created a poetry poster to celebrate National Poetry Month (April in the U.S.).  This one was especially fun and meaningful to make. The photo is of 2 works in progress by painter Scottie Parsons. Scottie left us this year in January, but her spirit remains with us--just as the sculpture of the pony you see here, named Spirito. Scottie donated Spirito to a charity auction, where it was the high-prize winner of the night. Scottie had two "slogans," which stay with me. They are:  "Beauty lives." and "My paintings are my conversations with God."

This year, given the abstract nature of my poem "Art Lesson," I turned to translator and editor Patricia Melgar in Argentina for editorial direction on the Spanish poster. Her translation is extraordinary and captures all the subtleties of the English while enabling the message to florecer en castellano.  On both versions, I counted on the skillful assistance of Jeff O'Dell for pre-press production.

If you would like to receive a poster, in English, Spanish, or both, please email me, and be sure to include your mailing address. I will ship the poster to you, anywhere in the world. Last year, posters went to many states in the U.S., and to Spain, Italy, Scotland, Mexico and Argentina.

Last year, I ran out of English posters. I printed more this year, but the sooner you send in your request, the better.  I will begin mailing on April 19.  You can send your address via a comment on this Blog. The comments come to me first, so your address will NOT be published. Or, contact me via my Website . And wait for your mail box to be filled with color and poetry!

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Como en años pasados, he creado un cartelito de poesía para celebrar el Mes Nacional de la Poesía (abril en EEUU). Este año, crear el cartelito ha sido un proceso muy especial. La foto en el cartel es de dos obras de la artista Scottie Parsons. Desafortunadamente, Scottie nos abandonó en enero, vencida por un cáncer agresivo, pero antes de partir de esta tierra, nos dejó unos mensajes muy importantes, los dos lemas de su vida:  1) "La belleza vive."  y 2) "Mis pinturas son mis conversaciones con Dios".  En estos pensamientos y en sus obras visuales, el espírito de Scottie nos hace compañía.  La escultura del caballito se llama "Spirito" y fue donado a una subasta caritativa.

Dado el índole abstracto del poema "Art Lesson" (Lección de arte), recurrí a la traductora y redactora bilingüe Patricia Melgar, en Argentina. Con su enorme talento, hizo posible que el poema florezca en castellano, sin "cortar" la sutileza del mensaje. Y el diseñador Jeff O'Dell me ayudó con todos los detalles de preparación para imprimir el cartel.

Si le gustaría recibir un cartel, en inglés, español, o los dos idiomas, favor de contactarse conmigo via correo-electrónico. Puede visitar mi sitio Web y enviarme mensaje o enviarme un comentario en este Blog.  Recuerde: hay que enviarme su dirección completa. El año pasado algunas  personas me pidieron el cartel, pero se olvidaron incluir sus señas.  Se le mando un cartel en cualquier rincón de mundo--gratis--todo en celebración de la poesía.  Empezaré los envíos el día 19 de abril. Y, después, ¡espere que lleguen el color y la poesía en su buzón de correo!

Comments

Anonymous said…
Perfectly wonderful. A fine tribute.

A poster for your Bowie friend, please.

Love ya, Cara

200 East Tarrant Street
Bowie 76230
Anonymous said…
Perfectly wonderful. A fine tribute.

A poster for your Bowie friend, please.

Love ya, Cara

200 East Tarrant Street
Bowie 76230

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