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Listen to What They Do

It's a catch phrase in Neurolinguistic Programming. "Don't listen to what someone says. Listen to what they do."

The American majority is clearly against continuing the war in Iraq and clearly for removing our troops as efficiently, safely, and quickly as possible. Do we "support our troops?" Yes! That's why we want them out of an unjustified conflict-turned-civil-war and back on home turf, where they are also needed. And where their families need them. Millions of us communicate this firm desire of the American people every day to someone in our government. And, then we have to listen to what they do. And do not do.

The Democrats have shown an amazing talent for sheer cowardice (again). Under threat of veto, they have folded and watered down the bill for not funding the continuation of the war. A veto will not destroy their precious chances of being elected again. Their not standing up to the veto will. What in God's name happened to the American tradition of taking a stand for what we know is right (the way Jimmy Carter does), whether we win or not, whether a special-interest group loves us or not?

The Democrats also proposed a very conservative 3.5 percent pay increase for military serving in Iraq and a small increase in death benefits to those families who lose their soldier(s) in Iraq forever. President Bush "vetoed" that, too. Currently, numerous American military families must resort to food stamps to feed their children. Many more have lost their homes because the mortgages could not be paid, once their National Guardsman has had to give up a career job to go to Iraq, and then stay there long past his or her original tour of duty.

US Military Officers on food stamps. Military families losing their homes, AND their loved ones. Our president has shown that he does not believe their "fight for freedom," their amputated limbs, their bloodied corpses, their bereaved families are worthy of even a minimal increase in financial compensation. And, the Democrats backed down from the proposal. Again.

The hot-shot Dems should be taking advice and leadership cues from Senator Russ Feingold, who has been a coherent, intelligent, courageous and steady voice from the beginning of the Iraq disaster. He writes:

"Under the President’s Iraq policies, our military has been over-burdened, our national security has been jeopardized, and thousands of Americans have been killed or injured. Despite these realities, and the support of a majority of Americans for ending the President’s open-ended mission in Iraq, congressional leaders now propose a supplemental appropriations bill that does nothing to end this disastrous war. I cannot support a bill that contains nothing more than toothless benchmarks and that allows the President to continue what may be the greatest foreign policy blunder in our nation’s history. There has been a lot of tough talk from members of Congress about wanting to end this war, but it looks like the desire for political comfort won out over real action. Congress should have stood strong, acknowledged the will of the American people, and insisted on a bill requiring a real change of course in Iraq."


When are you going to get it, políticos y políticas? We elected you so you would DO something. We're listening to what you do. And listening . . . . and listening . . . .

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For a good (though opinionated) commentary on today's "fold 'em" maneuver by the Dems, see Cosmic Wheel. For additional info, see Move On


Image, copyright 2007, Ysabel de la Rosa

Comments

deCinabre said…
I like Howard Fineman's view:
"I really want to play Texas hold-‘em with these people, because what they were doing, the Democrats, was pushing piles of chips into the middle of the table with each card, and then when the last one came by, they folded."

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